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Twenty One Pilots

Twenty One Pilots’ latest album, BLURRYFACE, opens a new chapter in the Columbus, Ohio-based band’s story. A chapter which finds the duo of Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun disinterested in expectation and certainty, instead absorbing themselves in the undefined and breaking new ground as they fearlessly reimagine the possibilities of their music. Twenty One Pilots’ candid expression and genuine identity has cemented the duo as the biggest group to break out in the past year and propelled them around the globe on a seemingly infinite world tour. An amazing journey anchored by Twenty One Pilots’ RIAA Platinum certified album BLURRYFACE which has generated a series of smash singles including; the RIAA Gold certified “Tear In My Heart,” the Modern Rock radio chart-topper “Ride” and  the RIAA Multi-Platinum certified crossover hit, “Stressed Out,” which reached the peak position at Top 40, Hot AC and Modern Rock radio outlets nationwide while earning Platinum certifications in Australia, Canada, Finland, Italy and the Netherlands. Widely considered among the most electrifying live acts in modern music, Twenty One Pilots have captivated audiences worldwide on sold-out arena runs and at international festivals with their transcendent stage show.

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The Lumineers

“Wesley Schultz, 9, who wants to be an artist, said, ‘I spend a lot of time on my drawings and it turns out good ’cause I’ve been practicing a lot.'”
-The New York Times, 3/15/92

Twenty years ago, Wesley Schultz saw the future.

Back then, growing up in the New York City suburb of Ramsey, New Jersey, Wesley spent his days drawing. Today, as bandleader of The Lumineers, Wesley’s replaced his pencil with a guitar and his drawings with songs. He still practices a lot, and it still turns out good.

In the spring of 2005, childhood friends Wesley and Jeremiah began to collaborate, writing together and playing gigs around New York. After battling the city’s cutthroat music scene and impossibly high cost of living, the two decided to expand their horizons. They packed everything they owned—nothing more than a couple suitcases of clothes and a trailer full of musical instruments—and headed for Denver, Colorado. It was less a pilgrimage than act of stubborn hopefulness.

The first thing they did in Denver was place a Craigslist ad for a cellist, and the first person to respond was Neyla Pekarek, a classically trained Denver native. As a trio, they began playing at the Meadowlark, a gritty basement club where the city’s most talented songwriters gathered every Tuesday for an open mic and dollar PBRs. Neyla softened Wes and Jer’s rough edges while expanding her skills to mandolin and piano. And so The Lumineers sound took shape; an amalgam of heart-swelling stomp-and-clap acoustic rock, classic pop, and front-porch folk.

In 2011, an eponymous, self-recorded EP led to a self-booked tour, and before long The Lumineers started attracting devout fans, first across the Western US, then back in their old East Coast stamping grounds. Young, old and in-between, they’re drawn by songs like “Ho Hey” and “Stubborn Love,” Americana-inflected barnburners in the vein of the Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons. They’re drawn by songs like “Slow it Down” and “Dead Sea,” slow, sultry ballads that suggest the raw revelations of Jeff Buckley and Ryan Adams. They’re drawn by the live Lumineers experience—a coming-together in musical solidarity against isolation, adversity, and despair.

The roots revival of the last few years has primed listeners for a new generation of rustic, heart-on-the-sleeve music—the kind that nods to tradition while setting off into uncharted territory. The Lumineers walk that line with an unerring gift for timeless melodies and soul-stirring lyrics

Powered by passion, ripened by hard work, The Lumineers have found their sound when the world needs it most.

www.TheLumineers.com

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TWITTER: @thelumineers
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Vance Joy

After dodging the camera for the first leg of his recording career, Vance Joy is staring down the barrel for the cover of his long-awaited debut Dream Your Life Away.

No more arty blurs, or in the case of the Riptide video, being totally MIA.

“You can see people’s personalities in their eyes,” Vance Joy says. “You can tell if someone is really feeling the song they’re singing. I wanted to have a straight on direct `look into my eyes’ moment for this album cover. If I’m going to regret anything it’s not going to be that my face looks like my face. People can like it or not like it, but I won’t look back and go `I shouldn’t have been wearing that hat’ or anything.”

Vance Joy has had an unexpectedly long time to finish his debut album. There’s a simple reason why – his first single Riptide kept charming the world and its charming author followed it around the globe. Several times over.

As well as selling out headline tours in Australia, Vance Joy performed at South By South West, Glastonbury, Firefly and Boonaroo Festivals before returning to Australia for Splendour In The Grass and then back to the UK, Europe, US and Canada for headline tours and V Festival, Lollapalooza, Outside Lands and Osheaga.

In Australia, Riptide moved from alternative to commercial radio, then commercial TV and got a second wind after it became the first song to top Triple J’s Hottest 100 countdown without an album to call home. Riptide went worldwide, hitting No.10 in the UK, and Top 10 in Austria, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. It has sold over a million copies worldwide, is being streamed over three million times a week and has cracked the American Top 100 after relentless touring. Riptide has gone four times platinum in Australia, with its award victory lap including the prestigious ARIA Song of the Year award.

“It’s taken on its own life,” the musician says of Riptide. “It’s definitely been a door opener. It’s running it’s own race now.”

Naturally Riptide surfaces on Dream Your Life Away, kept company by another track from the God Loves You When You’re Dancing EP, From Afar.

“It’s still one of my favorite songs,” Vance Joy admits.

They’re some of his earliest compositions. Back when Vance Joy was still Melbourne boy James Keogh, he’d been in a “shamelessly” Bloc Party inspired Uni band while he juggled footy with a law degree. Falling asleep in most classes suggested that maybe law wasn’t where his head was. Just prior to a three-month vacation, he wrote a song called Winds of Change.

It contains the phrase “an errant finger pokes me in the eye” as well as precisely zero obvious Bloc Party influence. Crucially, James Keogh had found his sound, just before he found his pseudonym Vance Joy (a character who likes to tell stories in Peter Carey’s book Bliss)

“Winds of Change is the first song I ever wrote that I thought was any good,” Vance Joy says. “It was 2009. It was a breakthrough. It planted the seed in my head of me being able to write good songs. So I went away and I had all these ideas running through my head, I didn’t take an instrument, I just made notes in a book. When I came back I wrote From Afar. Winds of Change was the first coherent song I wrote that I wanted to show people. I’m glad that song opens that album. It was the change in my songwriting, I discovered that strumming rhythm. It started something.”

Good things came fast. He pieced together Riptide on a dirt cheap ukulele (he’s since upgraded) from a few songs sitting on his cerebral scrap heap. That area in the back of his head also gave rise to new single Mess is Mine, a charming construct of good sections he managed to shoehorn in one song.

“It’s total cannibalisation that song,” Vance Joy explains. “There’s so many bits from other songs I had on the wreck heap. Some of the lyrics are from conversations I had, like my friend who had a crush on two blonde guys in a hostel in Byron Bay, so I got that line ‘check me in and check me out’ from her. That stayed with me. Riptide was pieced from a few songs I had lying around. You do whatever works.”

Books and films also provided plenty of inspiration. The movie in Riptide was Midnight Cowboy, while on Dream Your Life Away the tune We All Die Trying To Get It Right’ started life when Vance Joy was watching the movie Infamous about writer Truman Capote. “With a line like `we all die trying to get there’, sometimes you hear something and you put it in your phone. Well, you blatantly steal it. But rarely does something come to fit perfectly, even the syllables, but it did in that case.”

Who Am I parties like it’s 1899 – the year poet W.B Yeats wrote The Wind Among the Reeds, where Vance Joy saw the line about laying your dreams down at someone’s feet and asking them to be careful they don’t crush them.

Georgia, one of singer/songwriter’s personal favorites, was particularly important. He wrote it on January 1 this year, right in the throes of Riptide fever. “Hemingway says “I have written well, I will write well again”. The well doesn’t dry up. Before Georgia, I wasn’t feeling particularly inspired, then that song came out of nowhere. I was on a high for five days. You can’t force it, but it’s nice to know that now you recognise when a song is coming.”

Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast also provoked the ‘first cut is the deepest’ acknowledgement in First Time, the last song recorded for the album, again salvaged from one from Vance Joy’s ‘maybe’ pile. “I’m glad we resurrected it,” he says. “It’s turned out really well for a song I hadn’t thought about for a while.”

Red Eye captures a pre-frequent flyer Vance Joy who didn’t know the phrase for the night flight, also with a few lyrical (and canine) nods to Al Pacino in Scent of a Woman. “It’s a tried and true story,” Vance Joy says of the geographical heartache in Red Eye. “You put two lovers in a song, separate them and you’ve got three minutes to reunite them. I suppose it’s a story that has been told and re told in different forms. It’s reliable.”

Dream Your Life Away was recorded mainly just outside of Seattle with producer Ryan Hadlock (Lumineers, Gossip, Johnny Flynn) including a handful of songs (Mess is Mine, Winds of Change and Georgia) being finished off in a tree house on the studio grounds. “It was beautiful,” Vance Joy says of the gravity-defying recording sessions, “And it was cool being so super close as we were recording.” 

With his debut album finally finished, Vance Joy is in the enviable position of the entire world wanting to hear it all at the same time. He’s already blacked out the next year for touring, on the back of nearly two years of touring since Riptide was a mere ripple.

The album title, Dream Your Life Away, came to him after hearing John Lennon’s 1981 classic Watching the Wheels.

“He has that line ‘People say I’m crazy, dreaming my life away’ and I love that idea. That title feels like a good reflection of my life recently. It’s still all totally new to me. I still feel new as, which is good. I still feel like I’m just chipping away.” 

– Cameron Adams

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Arkells

“It’s a weird time to be a rock band right now,” observes Max Kerman, the singer, guitarist, and chief songwriter for the Arkells. “I just feel like rock has gotten so conservative and doesn’t know where to go. To be honest, I don’t really listen to a lot of rock music right now.”

That’s not a radical statement for your average twenty-something in this EDM-dominated era, but it’s a bit surprising coming from a guitar-slinging guy whose band seemingly personifies a certain old-school, ethic. Hailing from the gritty industrial outpost of Hamilton, Ontario, the Arkells have notched four Juno Awards and a gold record on their sweat-rusted belts, proving there’s still a place for passionate, no-bullshit rock ‘n’ soul in the mainstream. (In 2015, they were the most-played band on Canadian alt-rock radio.) But the group’s new album, Morning Report, betrays a more irreverent, adventurous ethos that more readily recalls the cut-and-paste approach of hip-hop beatmakers than the plug-and-play attack of a live rock band, with click-tracked rhythms, subliminal samples, electronic pulses, and sax and violins threaded into the richly textured mix.

Certainly, this is the Arkells’ most eclectic album to date, from the piano-pounded, “California Love”-schooled swagger of “Private School” to the silver-lined break-up song “My Heart’s Always Yours,” the sort of ascendant, blood-pumping anthem you can easily imagine sparking an arena full of waving illuminated smartphones. But if the Arkells have mostly scrubbed away the surface soot of their Hamilton-spawned sound, lyrically, Kerman’s songwriting hits even closer to home.

“A lot of the songs are about me and characters in my life: my friends, my parents, my girlfriend,” Kerman says. “And a lot of times, they’re songs about what happened the night before. So that’s why it’s called Morning Report: you text your friend the next day and it’s like, ‘Give me the morning report!’”

But Morning Report balances tales of last night’s debauchery with more sobering examinations of a time in life that doesn’t get much play in rock music: your late-twenties. It’s the phase when all your friends start getting married, your parents suddenly decide to get divorced, and long-distance relationships hit their shit-or-get-off-the-pot breaking point. But while melancholic, meditative ballads like “Passenger Seat” and “Come Back Home” provide unflinching portraits of marriages on the brink of collapse, rousing, soul-powered sing-alongs like “A Little Rain” pay poignant tribute to the friendships that help you through the tough times, and provide that much-needed shoulder to cry on.

“That’s another thing that’s so conservative about white-guy indie rock,” says Kerman. “What makes Drake so awesome is he just puts all his emotions right on the table for you to see. All of these songs and stories come from a genuine place for me.”

The morning reports we get from our friends may arrive through smartphone screens, but the songs on Morning Report all chronicle face-to-face interactions—with all the intimacy, intensity and awkwardness they entail.

“This is our weirdest, funniest, saddest record yet,” Kerman concludes. “And therefore, our most honest one, too.”

 

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The Naked And Famous

In 2010, Auckland, New Zealand’s Thom Powers, Alisa Xayalith, Aaron Short, David Beadle, and Jesse Wood arrived at the forefront of the international indie pop scene with the sweltering The Naked and Famous debut, Passive Me, Aggressive You. Riding on the feverish heights reached by singles like Young Blood, Punching In A Dream and Girls Like You the album thrust the band into the limelight and onto the airwaves.

Touring incessantly, the band settled permanently in Los Angeles to create the follow-up, 2013’s In Rolling Waves. The sophomore effort cast a darker shadow over their sound, straying from the synch-heavy formula that had ripped up radio charts yet patiently showcasing their unique skill, talent, and scope as artists.

TNAF set off to tour In Rolling Waves but after just a few months on the road, there were storm clouds on the horizon. Alisa and Thom’s relationship was the foundation of the band. As they said, “We started writing songs for The Naked and Famous the moment we got together at age 18.” Eight years later, their relationship was in turmoil and soon so was the band.

“It was awful,” says David. “People were unraveling pretty fast. The shows were tight but no-one was in a good space. People were trying to get off the bus, dragging their suitcase down the road in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere! When the tour bus finally stopped, everyone made for the exit and didn’t look back.”

The tour ended, Thom and Alisa separated, and TNAF became a group in ambiguous and painful hiatus. For the next year they barely saw one other. Los Angeles is a big enough place to get lost in.

“We weren’t talking about whether we’d broken up the band because we were so broken as individuals,” says Aaron.

Every band has its leader and source creator. It’s no secret that Thom Powers drives this band.

“I have a constant fear of failure,” he says. “My childhood dream was to be a musician and I’m not about to take this for granted. I feel lucky to have fans. I wake up and feel like any moment that I’m not working is time wasted.”

So in early 2015, it was no real surprise to find a batch of new demos from Thom’s Echo Park home studio in the band dropbox and a first TNAF meet-up in many months was convened.

“The best thing you can learn as a producer and a writer is to stop being precious. To get a grip, to let go and to learn how to embrace other people’s opinions,” says Thom. “We all came to this place with a little more maturity and it felt – tentatively – like we had a new path to follow.”

It was eventually agreed that working on a new album would become a regular Monday through Friday gig, the proper turning point coming in August of 2015 when they secured a small studio in Downtown LA to work in.

Assistance on the album came from only a handful of individuals. Sombear (Brad Hale) has worked on other projects with Thom and contributes production to Higher and My Energy. Carlos de la Garza engineered and Ken Andrews (Paramore) mixed the record. Thom still produces with input only from the other band members.

“We’ve ended up with a bright and very vocal album,” explains Thom. “TNAF has always naturally straddled the line between pop and alternative. Like most acts today though, when we talk about pop we’re only referring to production, arrangement or mixing. The lyrical content comes from a personal place.”

“There’s pain and passion behind this art,” says Alisa, picking up this theme. “Pop techniques are all about maximum impact. And it’s not like this is an album of bangers but it’s the most immediate thing we’ve ever done.”

Thom reveals the album title came from a lyric in the first song that was finished. Within the song Falling, it’s a contradictory statement he says – “We’re made in simple forms.”

“Being a functioning human means living in a constant state of delusion about the simplicity and order of the world. I like summing up the album in this way. There is no singular message. No unity of emotion. The irony also being that an album is a brutally curated collection of ideas.”

And true to the complex and contradictory nature of being in a band, it is not a name they could all agree on. “Simple forms reminds me of the DMV,” says Jesse. “But I get what Thom’s saying.”

Being a band that can fight with and for each other is not so unusual but that doesn’t mean it is not a triumph to produce a record like Simple Forms at this point in TNAF’s career.

“We’re still incredibly self-sufficient,” says Alisa. “We’re lucky to have this. We’re lucky to still have one another.”

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Jake Bugg

Recorded in London, Los Angeles and Nottingham, highlights are many and include the moving ‘Love Hope And Misery’ driven by a huge chorus, the stomping ‘Bitter Salt’, the soulful ‘Never Wanna Dance’ and the defining title track.

For all its diversity, the heartbeat of ‘On My One’ is the blues. “Blues is my favourite genre,” Jake admits. “Whether it’s soul or hip hop, it all stems from the blues. To me the blues just means singing your emotions and expressing your pain so others can feel it. That’s the beauty of music. If nothing else, I’d like to think I’ve done that with this record.”

To make three albums by the age of 21 is no mean feat. To singlehandedly make ‘On My One’ shapeshifting effortlessly from blues to pop, rap to folk and soul to country through great songwriting is nothing short of remarkable. Enjoy the ride.

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Wintersleep

Dine Alone Records is pleased to announce Wintersleep have signed a worldwide record deal with the label. The Halifax-bred, Montreal-based band are the latest addition to the roster, which includes labelmates City and Colour, The Lumineers, Tokyo Police Club, and many more. They will release a new album in winter 2016 called The Great Detachment.

Joel Carriere, President of Dine Alone Records, described the first time they heard the new songs, “I wish footage existed from when we first listened to Wintersleep’s new record. Everyone who was in the office was smiling, nodding their heads, and were thrilled at the idea of being a part of the next chapter for one of Canada’s great rock bands. Forget that they are an amazing band, had huge records, and are sweet dudes, and look to the future of The Great Detachment. These songs are fucking bangers, big, sweet bangers, and we couldn’t be more excited to be a part of it.”

Wintersleep is vocalist/guitarist Paul Murphy, drummer Loel Campbell, guitarist Tim D’eon, bassist Mike Bigelow, and keyboardist Jon Samuel. The JUNO Award-winning band have released five previous full-length records. They took a break after the release and touring of their 2012 album Hello Hum, and, during that time, wrote a wealth of new material in their Montreal studio. The band then carefully curated the 11 songs comprising The Great Detachment and returned to record to Halifax’s Sonic Temple with producer Tony Doogan (Belle & Sebastian, Mogwai).

The Great Detachment was, in majority, recorded live-off-the-floor, adding an organic and transparent aural aesthetic to the collection. “It’s a very different energy,” singer Murphy opines, “and one that we kind of missed.”

 The Great Detachment is a rock album overwhelmed with a musical warmth which harkens back to the era of Wintersleep’s much-loved break-out song Weighty Ghost. It’s a call to their fans to assemble and sing along to a new raft of tunes borne from reflection and changing technologies. Touring and new album details will be announced in early 2016.

Members

  • Paul Murphy – Vocals, Guitar
  • Tim D’Eon – Guitar
  • Loel Campbell – Drums

 

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Banners

Born in Liverpool, UK, BANNERS was fascinated by dreams, life, death, hope and despair. He grew up singing in the Liverpool Anglican Cathedral Choir and the Liverpool Kop. After singing in cathedrals and concert halls across Europe, BANNERS went to work on his own material. Influenced by artists ranging from The Beatles to Arcade Fire, BANNERS’ music is at once haunting and hopeful, sure to resonate with audiences across space and age.

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Atlas Genius

Warner Brothers Records has just released Inanimate Objects, the new album from Atlas Genius. “The euphoric first single “Molecules” is available now!

Produced by Atlas Genius and Frederik Thaae, Inanimate Objects is the follow-up to the band’s 2013 full-length debut, When It Was Now, which was hailed by Rolling Stone as a “spritely, melodic debut album” and featured the Gold-certified hit single “Trojans.” After being discovered by the blog Neon Gold, “Trojans” gained momentum online and on the radio. The band was signed to Warner Bros. Records and began 18 months of non-stop touring, including two national headline tours, opening for Imagine Dragons and Silversun Pickups and playing festivals like Lollapalooza, Outside Lands, Sasquatch, Firefly and many others. They also performed on numerous television shows, including The Tonight Show With Leno, The Late Show With David Letterman, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Conan and Jimmy Kimmel Live!

Inanimate Objects was recorded in Adelaide, Australia and Studio City, CA. It was mixed by Andrew Maury in Brooklyn and Manny Marroquin in Los Angeles. It was mastered by Joe LaPorta at Sterling Sound in NYC.

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Hannah Georgas

Light dancing with shadow, fingers finding answers in the expanse of a keyboard, a voice that shimmers even in its most shattering moments—this is the power of acclaimed pop singer-songwriter Hannah Georgas. Over two full-length albums, 2010’s This is Good and 2012’s self-titled follow-up, she’s traversed a carefully constructed soundscape that never fails to surprise. Georgas has an endless capacity for crafting textured pop songs that confound expectation. She’s as likely to layer luminous, devastating, and witty as she is upbeat, broken, and defiant. This is what makes her music, even at its simplest, so transfixing, something that’s never more evident than on Georgas’ forthcoming release, For Evelyn.

For Evelyn is Hannah Georgas’ third record. Since her debut release, the Toronto-based musician has won numerous awards and racked up multiple nominations, including four Juno nods, for everything from Best New Artist to Songwriter of the Year. Georgas has toured the world, sharing stages with the likes of Kathleen Edwards, City and Colour, and Sara Bareilles, playing everywhere from Madison Square Gardens to the LA Greek Theatre. Georgas’ music has also been featured on HBO’s hit show, Girls.

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Wildlife

The heart is a funny thing. It’s strong, vulnerable, vital, but unlike most of the important things in our lives, it’s not protected by bricks or Kevlar. Unless you have a Kevlar heart… and if so, where did you       get it? Can I have one? For the rest of us, we put ourselves out into the world blind and unguarded; we love, we live and sometimes we get hit (possibly hard). When we mess-­‐up or get messed-­‐ up, our hearts help us use those mess-­‐ups to learn, to light the way, and get a bit closer to a less messed-­‐up truth.

Wildlife has always kind of been about a similar kind of thinking. We’re all in this together, so lets get movin’, always forward, never back, don’t dwell on the past, let’s build on our mistakes, try new things and stop pretending you know everything cause you don’t and that’s annoying. AND That’s pretty much what our entire first record was about! Strike Hard, Young Diamond (our first record) was a study of letting go, an observation of youth, what it means to be young, reckless, naïve and all of the incredible things that can come out of happy accidents. We used themes of adventure, exploration and vitality to explain jumping into the dark, deep water not knowing or caring where you came up for air.

I guess it only makes sense that our new record is about realization. It probably asks more questions than gives answers. The one answer it does give is really nothing new, but it has a lot of meaning to me either way, which is why we call it “…On The Heart”. We view it as an essay, a love letter, a tribute to the heart itself. Everything it does for us, to us, how it helps us and hurts us. How it heals us, holds us up and pushes us forward. It keeps us going, keeps us living and gives us a place to be free. Don’t stop believin’? Follow your dreams? Sure. But it seems to me that the heart is too complex to be summed up in a catchphrase. I think it would be fair to say that this new album was created to try to make a little sense of that complex, mysterious, vital muscle. Maybe with a couple catchphrases thrown in for good measure. We buried our hearts deep inside this thing, and we hope you love it as much as we do.

Dean Povinsky + Wildlife

(Dean Povinsky is some guy who just wrote this thing you read. He is the lead singer and guitarist of Wildlife, along with Derek Bosomworth (bass), Dwayne Christie (drums) and Graham Plant (guitar). Their critically acclaimed, not so good selling first album Strike Hard, Young Diamond came out in November 2010. But what they care about right now is …On The Heart, to be released March 5 2013 on Wax Records. It was recorded with some really awesome guys named Peter Katis (The National, Interpol) Gus Van Go and Werner F (The Stills, Hollerado). Wildlife lives in Toronto, but they want to come meet you in person and spoil you rotten.)

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Zella Day

Pisces water sign, Arizona native raised in the mountains. Elevated 7,200 feet above the Phoenix valley, Zella was nestled into a log cabin with an acoustic guitar in a town surrounded by the Sitgreaves National Forest and Apache reservation. Immersed in music at a young age, her family owning the only coffee house in town with life music, Z was apart of a very small artist community that supported her natural desire to write music. Now residing in Los Angeles, Zella Day incorporates her simplistic roots and blends them with the eclectic sounds of the West Coast.

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Modern Space

Modern Space is a 5 piece band out of Toronto, Canada. The group, consisting of members Sean Watson Graham (vocals) Sam Arion (guitar), Alex Laurie (guitar), Cody Steele (bass) and Tay Ewart (drums) have already shared the stage with an impressive cast of musicians including Lights, The Vaccines and Arkells. In creating their debut EP Before Sunrise the group worked with producer Tawgs Salter (Lights, Walk Off the Earth, Scott Helman, USS). At the start of this year, Modern Space were selected to be part of Spotify’s Spotlight 2016 program. The Spotlight campaign features a small group of new Canadian artists to watch, and will see the band heavily featured throughout the streaming service. For all the latest information on Modern Space make sure you are following them on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

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Darcys

Darcys are an alt-pop duo from Toronto, Canada. Their four releases on Arts & Crafts include two studio records, a full reimagining of Steely Dan’s AJA and a 20-minute Southern Gothic-themed instrumental track. The band’s current single – shiny, summer anthem “Miracle” – was produced alongside Grammy-Award winner Shawn Everett (Alabama Shakes) and is available now. thedarcys.ca

OFFICIAL WEBSITE

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

INSTAGRAM

YOUTUBE

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The Royal Foundry

Both Jared and Bethany were born and raised amongst the beautiful Prairie-Skies of Alberta, Canada. Bethany was the preacher’s daughter who developed a love for the visual arts. Jared on the other hand grew up surrounded by music as the son of a Touring-Rock-Musician. They quickly formed through a musical and literal marriage. Jared and Bethany Salte had no intentions of starting the Electro-Folk-Pop trio that is now The Royal Foundry; But after the release of “All We Have” received international exposure through the John Lennon Songwriting Competition and ABC’s Rookie Blue they knew they had discovered something special.

Their latest release “Running Away” has been featured on TSN as the opening song for the CFL. This new direction pulls them away from their folk roots and is the sort of music you might expect if Mutemath crashed a tea party with Coldplay and The Civil Wars. Their list of accolades reads like a list of a band that’s been together for at least a decade. It’s hard to imagine that this has happened in two short years.

OFFICIAL WEBSITE

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

INSTAGRAM

YOUTUBE

 

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Syd Arthur

Syd Arthur – singer Liam Magill, his brother Joel (bass, vocals), Raven Bush (violin, keyboards, mandolin), and Fred Rother (drums) – emerged out of Kent early in the new century, their post-millennial revision of classic British psychedelic music leading MOJO to proclaim them “Canterbury’s dazzling new sons.” On An On, the band’s 2012 debut album (released in 2013 by Harvest), affirmed their insatiable appetite for invention, bridging ambitious time-shifting workouts with indelible folk-pop dazzlers like the breakthrough single, “Ode To The Summer.”

Syd Arthur also earned hosannas as an exhilarating live act, honing their distinctive jams through near-constant performance, from their start playing self-promoted festies to myriad headline shows in both the UK and the US with support slots in the past alongside such like-minded artists as White Denim, Vampire Weekend and the one and only Paul Weller, as well as upcoming performances tours with Jonathan Wilson and Sean Lennon’s The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger. Performing on increasingly bigger stages proved a valuable lesson and a significant influence on the band’s musical perspective.

OFFICIAL WEBSITE

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

INSTAGRAM

SOUNDCLOUD

YOUTUBE

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Syd Arthur +
X Fest